1

21 Reasons To Visit Storm King This Summer

  Mark Di Suvero, Figolu, 2005. Steel, 47’ 1” x 55’ x 23’. Lent by the artist and Spacetime C.C., New York. Photograph by Jerry L. Thompson


By PAUL LASTER
, MAY 2016

One of the world’s leading outdoor sculpture parks, the 56-year- old Storm King Art Center features more than 100 artworks on its 500-acre grounds, which is located just one hour north of New York City. Exhibiting works from its permanent collection, including major sculptural works by Alexander Calder, Mark di Suvero and David Smith, alongside loans of important pieces by such artists as Linda Benglis, Roy Lichtenstein and Barnett Newman and a variety of special exhibitions.

On a recent visit to view a survey of outdoor and indoor works by Dennis Oppenheim and a series of site-specific installations by Josephine Halvorson, we toured the park to see some of our favorite pieces, which are spread throughout Storm King’s delightfully landscaped fields, hills and woodlands.

Scroll through the images to see more of our picks below. WM

Lynda Benglis, North South East West, 1988/2009/2014-15. Cast bronze fountain and steel. Four elements, each 66" x 7' 6" x 56" (167.6 x 228.6 x 142.1 cm). Courtesy the artist; Cheim & Read, New York; and Locks Gallery, Philadelphia. © Lynda Benglis / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY. Photograph by Jerry L. Thompson 
 

Siah Armajani, Gazebo for Two Anarchists: Gabriella Antolini and Alberto Antolini, 1992. Painted steel and wood, 10’ 6” x 32’ 6” x 8’ 5”. Gift of The Brown Foundation, Inc., The Ralph E. Ogden Foundation, Cynthia Hazen Polsky, an Anonymous Foundation, Gifts In Memory of Elizabeth Collens, and The Joseph H. Hazen Foundation Purchase Fund. Photograph by Jerry L. Thompson 
 

Alexander Calder, The Arch, 1975. Painted steel, 50' x 41' 6" x 34' 10". Purchase Fund and Gift of the Ralph E. Ogden Foundation. Photograph by Jerry L. Thompson
 

Roy Lichtenstein, Mermaid, 1994. Painted carbon fiber and epoxy over aluminum honeycomb core. 8 x 77 x 14’. © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein. Photograph by Jerry L. Thompson
 

Joel Shapiro, Untitled, 1994. Bronze, 21’ x 19’ x 14’. Gift of Sony Corporation of America. ©Joel Shapiro, courtesy Pace Gallery. Photograph by Kayla Nales
 

Dennis Oppenheim, Architectural Cactus Grove, #1–6, 2008. Water-jet-cut aluminum, translucent fiberglass panels, colored aluminum sheet, anodized aluminum, diamond plate aluminum, roofing panels, grating. Area covered: 1/2 acre (1,000 sq. m). ©Dennis Oppenheim. Architectural Cactus #1-5: Dennis Oppenheim Estate. Architectural Cactus #6 gift of The Watermill Center, New York, NY. Photograph by Jerry L. Thompson 
 

 David Smith, Becca, 1964. Steel, 6’ 6” x 47 ½” x 23 ½”. Gift of The Ralph E. Ogden Foundation. Photograph by Paul Laster
 Chakaia Booker, A Moment in Time, 2004.
Rubber tires, stainless steel, and steel 10’ x 9’ 1” x 10’ 2” Overall.
Gift of The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation. Photograph by Jerry L. Thompson 
 

Josephine Halvorson, Measure, 2016. Acrylic on wood.
12' x 12" x 3 1/2" (365.7 x 30.5 x 8.9 cm).
Courtesy the artist and Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York. Photograph by Jerry L. Thompson 
 

Alexander Liberman, Adonai, 1970–71 (refabricated 2000). Steel, 29' 6" x 63' x 52' 8".
Gift of the Ralph E. Ogden Foundation. Photograph by Jerry L. Thompson 
 

 Daniel Buren, Sit Down, 1998 (Refabricated 2010).
Painted aluminum 17 ¾ x 17 ¾ x 53 ⅛” each.
Gift of The Ralph E. Ogden Foundation. Photograph by Jerry L. Thompson  
 

Zhang Huan, Three Legged Buddha, 2007. Steel and copper. 28’ 2 ½” x 42’ x 22’ 7 ⅝”.
Gift of Zhang Huan and Pace Gallery. Photograph by Jerry L. Thompson 
 

 Ursula von Rydingsvard, Luba, 2009–10. Cedar, cast bronze, and graphite. 17’ 6” x 59” x 59”. Made possible through generous lead support from the artist, Roberta and Steven Denning, Galerie Lelong, Nancy Brown Negley and The Brown Foundation, Inc. of Houston, and Thomas A. and Georgina T. Russo. Additional support is provided by an anonymous donor, The Hazen Polsky Foundation, The Ohnell Family Foundation, and Hume R. Steyer. Special thanks also go to Henry S. Mcneil and Marion Swingle. Photograph by Jerry L. Thompson 
 

 Barnett Newman, Broken Obelisk, 1963/1967 (Exhibition Copy 2005).
Weathering steel 25’ 5” x 10’ 6” x 10’ 6”.
The Barnett Newman Foundation. Photograph by Jerry L. Thompson  
 

 Alyson Shotz, Mirror Fence, 2003 (Refabricated 2014). Starphire mirror and aluminum 138’ x 36” x 4”. Gift of the artist and Derek Eller Gallery, with generous lead support from Roberta and Steven Denning; Additional support provided by  The Donald R. Mullen Family Foundation and Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. Schwartz. Photograph by Jerry L. Thompson 
 

  Louise Nevelson, City on the High Mountain, 1983. Painted steel 20’ 6” x 23’ x 13’ 6”. Purchase Fund. Photograph by Jerry L. Thompson
 

 Maya Lin, Storm King Wavefield, 2007–08. Earth and grass. 240,000 Square Feet (11-Acre Site). © Maya Lin Studio, courtesy Pace Gallery

 Andy Goldsworthy, Storm King Wall, 1997–98. Fieldstone, Approx. 60" X 2,278' 6" X 32" overall. Gift of The Ralph E. Ogden Foundation, Mr. and Mrs. Joel Mallin, Mrs. W. L. Lyons Brown, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. James H. Ottaway, Jr., The Margaret T. Morris Foundation, The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation, The Hazen Fund, The Joseph H. Hazen Foundation, Inc., Mr. and Mrs. Ronald N. Romary, Dr. Wendy Schaffer and Mr. Ivan Gjaja, and an anonymous foundation. Photograph by Jerry L. Thompson

 Sol LeWitt, Five Modular Uits, 1971 (Refrabricated 2008).
Painted Aluminum, 63" X 63" X 24' 3 ½".
Gift of The Ralph E. Ogden Foundation. Photograph by Jerry L. Thompson
 

 Richard Serra, Schunnemunk Fork, 1990–91. Weathering Steel. A) 8' X 49' 1" X 2 ½" B) 8' X 35' 1" X 2 ½" C) 8' X 38' 4" X 2 ½" D) 8' X 54' 4" X 2 ½"Gift of The Ralph E. Ogden Foundation, by exchange, The Brown Foundation, Inc., and an anonymous foundation. Photograph by Jerry L. Thompson

 

 

Paul Laster

Paul Laster is a writer, editor, independent curator, artist and lecturer. He is a New York desk editor at ArtAsiaPacific and a contributing editor at Whitehot and artBahrain. He was the founding editor of Artkrush.com and Artspace.com and art editor of Flavorpill.com and Russell Simmons's OneWorld Magazine; started TheDailyBeast.com's art section; and worked as a photojournalist for Artnet.com and Art in America. He is a frequent contributor to Time Out New York, New York Observer, Modern Painters, ArtPulse and ArtInfo.com.

Follow Whitehot on Twitter

Follow Whitehot on Instagram 

view all articles from this author

Reader Comments (1)



Your comments. . .


Your First Name (not shown):
Your Last Name (not shown):
Your Email Address (not shown):
Your Username: